Courses

 

ECON 100: Economics and Society
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: A course designed for the nonmajor who wishes an introduction to economic reasoning and policy making. The major concepts of modern economics will be discussed along with applications of the theory to important contemporary problems such as inflation, recession, productivity, income distribution, economic concentration, and the U.S. role in the world economy. Accounting majors should take Economics 101. Not open to students who are enrolled in or who have received credit for Economics 101.

 


 

ECON 101: Introduction to Macroeconomics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Covers the nature and methods of economics and survey of major economics problems; the determinants of national income and output, the price level, and employment; the role of money and banking in the economy; and the role of the government's fiscal and monetary policies. May not be taken for credit if Economics 103 has already been taken.

 


 

ECON 102: Introduction to Microeconomics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: How decisions are made by the consumer and producer sectors of the economy and the interactions between the two sectors; the process of resource allocation and income distribution within a free enterprise economy as well as alternative market structures such as monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition; and the effects of various government policies on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income. May not be taken for credit if Economics 104 has already been taken.

 


 

ECON 103: The Global Economy
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: The impact of globalization on consumers, workers, the structure of production, markets, and government and international regulation and economic strategies; the determinants of economic growth and development, the nature of international trade and finance, as well as the phenomena of inflation and unemployment; the changing structure of selected national economies. The course may not be taken for credit if Economics 101 has already been taken.

 


 

ECON 104: The Market Society
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: A topic focused, problem-solving course on micro-oriented applications of economic reasoning. The laws of supply and demand are introduced in a framework that concentrates on how firms, consumers, investors and the government interact to produce relevant economic outcomes. Specific topics explored are instructor-specific; please check the syllabi of the relevant faculty for details. The course may not be taken for credit if Economics 102 has already been taken.

 


 

ECON 134W: Writing Tutorial
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: A one-credit add-on course to a regular subject matter course on a co-registration basis. This course works on writing that is relevant to the subject matter of the main course. Co-registration means that all students in the regular course will not necessarily be in the writing tutorial. The combination of a regular course and a Economics Writing Tutorial satisfies one of the College’s writing intensive course requirements. May be repeated for credit.

 


 

ECON 135W: Economics Writing Workshop
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: A one-credit add-on course to a regular subject matter course on a co-requisite basis. This course works on writing that is integral to the subject matter of the main course. Co-requisite means that all students in the regular course will be in the writing workshop. The combination of a regular course and a Economics Writing Workshop satisfies one of the College’s writing intensive course requirements. May be repeated for credit.

 


 

ECON 201: Macro-Economic Analysis (Formerly ECON206)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104
Description: National income measurement; macro-economic theories of income, employment, prices, and interest rates; public policies for growth and stabilization. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 226 has been taken (see also Economics 226).

 


 

ECON 202: Price Theory (Formerly ECON205)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and MATH 131 or the equivalent
Description: Familiarizes the student with the technical tools of economic analysis. Covers price, input and output decisions of the business firm; the forces behind supply of and demand for the product of the firm and industry; and the factors determining the distribution of income. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 225 has been taken (see also Economics 225).

 


 

ECON 203: Development of Economic Thought
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of instructor; ENGL 110
Description: Traces the evolution of economic doctrines both in their institutional context and with reference to central issues that are of present-day significance.

 


 

ECON 204: International Political Economy
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103
Description: The important conceptual frameworks for considering the international political economy starting with mercantilism and ending with issues of international financial governance regime theories. Questions of property rights, state-market tensions, global public goods and bads, foreign direct investment and debt, structural adjustment programs and the creation of new financial architecture along with an examination of global economic governance institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization will be considered in the light of different approaches to the international political economy.

 


 

ECON 205: ECON202 HAS REPLACED ECON205 (Price Theory)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and MATH 131 or the equivalent
Description: Familiarizes the student with the technical tools of economic analysis. Covers price, input and output decisions of the business firm; the forces behind supply of and demand for the product of the firm and industry; and the factors determining the distribution of income. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 225 has been taken (see also Economics 225).

 


 

ECON 206: ECON201 HAS REPLACED ECON206 (Macro-Economic Analysis)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104
Description: National income measurement; macro-economic theories of income, employment, prices, and interest rates; public policies for growth and stabilization. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 226 has been taken (see also Economics 226).

 


 

ECON 207: Comparative Economic and Financial Systems
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: Despite the evolution of many world economies toward the market system and privatization, the major differences - formal, cultural, and informal - in the financial, legal, accounting, social and economic institutions, ownership, business practices and economic policy-making in both the transitioning economies and the world’s major economies pose major challenges for international business decision making and cause major differences in economic performance, income distribution, growth and efficiency of these economies. This course analyzes these components of an economy within a decision-making-information-motivation framework. Examples will be drawn from a number of economies including US, EU, Russia, Mexico, China and Pakistan. Of particular interest are macroeconomic institutions, monetary and fiscal policy, relationships to the world economic organizations as well as the internal political and legal frame work which influences privatization, market structures, competition and comparative internalization of social costs. Also examines the impact of systems and the political and social relationships in the behavior of economic institutions.

 


 

ECON 208: The Process of Economic Development
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: The causes of differences in the levels of economic performance among countries; major theories of economic development; policies for economic development.

 


 

ECON 210: Transformation of Economic Systems
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: This course is concerned with the breakup and reconstitution of economic systems from antiquity to the present. The emphasis will be on primitive, feudal, and contemporary underdeveloped economies.

 


 

ECON 211: Economics of Asia
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of department; ENGL 110

 


 

ECON 212: Economics of Latin America
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of department; ENGL 110

 


 

ECON 213: Economics of the Labor Force
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: Theoretical and public policy issues relating to wage determination, labor markets, the labor force, wages, prices, productivity, employment, human resources, and income maintenance.

 


 

ECON 214: Economics of Organized Labor
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: Includes collective bargaining in the public and private sectors and labor problems of minorities.

 


 

ECON 215: Money and Banking
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104
Description: Description and analysis of monetary and banking principles and institutions.

 


 

ECON 217: ECON317 has replaced ECON217 (Public Finance)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 202 or 225; ENGL 110
Description: Such topics as government expenditures, distribution of the tax burden, equity in taxation, tax competition, and the national debt.

 


 

ECON 218: The Economics of State and Local Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: Such topics as the demand for government services, intergovernmental fiscal relations, the distribution of various public services within and between governmental jurisdictions, governmental budgeting processes, and sources of revenue.

 


 

ECON 219: Economics of Class, Race, and Sex
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103; ENGL 110
Description: This course is concerned with theoretical and historical explanations of stratification by class, race, sex, and ethnicity. Specifically, it is concerned with explaining differential rates of progress among ethnic groups; the economic position of the black population versus the white one; black/white males vis-à-vis black

 


 

ECON 219W: Economics of Class, Race, and Sex
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103; ENGL 110
Description: This course is concerned with theoretical and historical explanations of stratification by class, race, sex, and ethnicity. Specifically, it is concerned with explaining differential rates of progress among ethnic groups; the economic position of the black population versus the white one; black/white males vis-à-vis black

 


 

ECON 220: Consumer Economics and Personal Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: This course covers personal financial planning, consumer decision making, present value theory, money management, and credit. Specific topics include: income taxes, investing and portfolio management, risk management (insurance), pensions, long-term family and estate planning, and the problems of information and transaction costs. Students learn to use a spreadsheet on the IBM PC to solve various case problems.

 


 

ECON 221: The Economy of Greece
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: This course will focus on the postwar structure and performance of the Greek economy. An examination of overall growth as well as growth of the agricultural, industrial, and service sectors will be pursued, taking into account the private-versus-public sector dichotomy. Special consideration will be given to external economic relations of Greece, its membership in the EEC, and balance of payments problems. The structural effects of external relations upon domestic development will be traced, dealing, for example, with migration and income distribution.

 


 

ECON 222: European Economic History since 1750
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: Emphasizes the processes and repercussions of industrialization.

 


 

ECON 223: The Development of the American Economy to 1914
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110

 


 

ECON 223W: The Development of the American Economy to 1914
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110

 


 

ECON 224: American Economic History since 1914
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110

 


 

ECON 225: Price Theory (Mathematics Emphasis)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and MATH 132 or 143 or 152
Description: Identical to Economics 202, except taught with a greater use of mathematical tools. Recommended for students planning to do graduate work in economics and business. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 202 has been taken.

 


 

ECON 226: Macro-Economic Analysis (Mathematical Emphasis)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and MATH 132 or 143 or 152
Description: Identical to Economics 201 except taught with a greater use of mathematical tools. Recommended for students planning to do graduate work in economics and business. This course cannot be taken for credit if Economics 201 has been taken.

 


 

ECON 228: The Economics of the Environment
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of instructor; ENGL 110
Description: The economic causes of environmental problems and the problems encountered in estimating the economic cost of environmental damages. Application of economic theory to establish the conditions for the best use of the environment, and to evaluate economic costs and benefits of current regulatory policy.

 


 

ECON 228W: The Economics of the Environment
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 or permission of instructor; ENGL 110
Description: The economic causes of environmental problems and the problems encountered in estimating the economic cost of environmental damages. Application of economic theory to establish the conditions for the best use of the environment, and to evaluate economic costs and benefits of current regulatory policy.

 


 

ECON 229: History of International Business and Finance, 1850 to the Present
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104
Description: This course will study the evolution of typical international business and financial structures and their performance through readings and lectures on international enterprise and national economic histories from the first era of globalization to the present. The business of export-import, financing trade and international investment, and multinational enterprise will be covered. Other topics will include the evolution of international monetary systems, trade regulation, and the size of the international economy.

 


 

ECON 230: Women's Issues in Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: Includes discussion of participation of women in the labor force; distribution of women among occupations; work outside the marketplace and in the home; wage differentials between men and women; and government policies that affect the economic position of women.

 


 

ECON 230W: Women's Issues in Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: Includes discussion of participation of women in the labor force; distribution of women among occupations; work outside the marketplace and in the home; wage differentials between men and women; and government policies that affect the economic position of women.

 


 

ECON 231: Economic Development of China
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 131 and ECON 101 or 103 and ECON 102 or 104 and ENGL 110
Description: This is a basic survey course on China's economic development from a historical perspective. After a short review of some of China's pre-1949 economic history, the course focuses on the People's Republic, with roughly half the semester devoted to the period of Mao's leadership (1949-1976) and the balance devoted to the post-Mao period of reform and transition to a market economy (1978-present).

 


 

ECON 232: Economics of Climate Change
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 102 or 104
Description: Description of economic effects of climate change. Theory of externalities. Benefit-cost analysis and intergenerational accounting. Methods of economic valuation. Economic policies to address consequences of climate change.

 


 

ECON 233: Globalization Now and Then
3 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 and 102
Description: Is the world getting flatter? This course examines globalization with a historical perspective: the forces driving globalization, the forces slowing it down, and its effects on the world economy. In the first part of the course, students learn framework models of economic growth, trade, and institutional development. The second part takes them through the changes in the flows of goods, services, capital, and people across borders over the last five centuries. In the third part, we examine the effects of globalization on human capital accumulation, violence, and inequality.

 


 

ECON 240: ECON340 has replaced ECON240: Industrial Organization
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: The economic functions of business firms; the theory and practice of internal organization of firms; market structure and performance of competitors, oligopolists, etc., and their effects on economic welfare; business as a social and political institution; the large firm in a mixed economy.

 


 

ECON 242: Regulation of American Business
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: The origin, evaluation, and present pattern of government regulation of business; the organization of industry; anti-trust and the promotion of competition and prevention of monopoly and public regulation; public policies in natural resource and environmental conservation.

 


 

ECON 245: Economics of Technology, Media, and Telecommunications.
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 100 or 102
Description: The origin, evaluation, and present pattern of government regulation of the media telecommunications and high-tech industries and the impact of these regulations on their industries.

 


 

ECON 246: Urban Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104; ENGL 110
Description: The microeconomics of U. S. urban development patterns from the industrial revolution to the present. Decentralization of economic activity and population; the resulting urban problems and possible solutions to these problems.

 


 

ECON 249: Statistics as Applied to Economics and Business
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and MATH 122 or MATH 131 or MATH 141 or MATH 151 or MATH 157
Description: The topics covered are descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, sampling statistical inference, estimation, and simple correlation and regression. (Not open to students with credit for Mathematics 241, which will be accepted in lieu of Economics 249.)

 


 

ECON 260: Economics of Health and Income Maintenance Program
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: This course analyzes both individual and public policy decisions surrounding health and resource allocation issues in the health care sector of the U.S. The demand, production, cost, and financing of health are examined using a variety of conceptual and empirical models. Income maintenance programs are also discussed. The main emphasis is on the United States; comparisons with other countries may also be included.

 


 

ECON 301: The Economics of CryptoAsset
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 201 or 215
Description: The application of economic principles to provide a comprehensive overview of blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies. Topics considered include the basics of bitcoin and blockchain technology a taxonomy of cryptoassets valuation framework for cryptoassets cryptotokens as micropayments governance issues and the democratization of entrepreneurship and innovation through digital tokens.

 


 

ECON 302: Blockchain and Money
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 301
Description: Understand exactly what a blockchain is, why it matters for business activities with emphasis on the financial sector.  Blockchain’s role as a decentralized distributed ledger is analyzed through use cases in technology, business, and enterprise products and institutions.  Topics include the governance and regulatory issues surrounding blockchain’s applications.

 


 

ECON 317: Public Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 202 or 225; ENGL 110
Description: Such topics as government expenditures, distribution of the tax burden, equity in taxation, tax competition, and the national debt.

 


 

ECON 326: International Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 202 or 225
Description: An introduction to the theory of international trade and to empirical tests of trade theory.

 


 

ECON 328: International Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and 201 or 226; ENGL 110
Description: An analysis of the economics of balance of payments, the foreign exchange market, international liquidity and adjustment problems, exchange rate systems and their influence on internal and external balance, international financial institutions, international capital movements, financial problems of economic integration.

 


 

ECON 340: Industrial Organization
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and ECON 202; ENGL 110
Description: The economic functions of business firms; the theory and practice of internal organization of firms; market structure and performance of competitors, oligopolists, etc., and their effects on economic welfare; business as a social and political institution; the large firm in a mixed economy.

 


 

BUS 344: Marketing Research (formerly ECON344)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 243 and 249
Description: A study of the nature of scientific research methods applied to the solution of marketing problems. Emphasis on planning projects and formulating the problem; methods of gathering data, including applications of sampling; interpreting data; and presentation of the results. Some attention is given to a discussion of the essential features of the applied areas of motivation research, advertising research, product research, and sales research.

 


 

ECON 382: Introduction to Econometrics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 131 or equivalent and ECON 249 or equivalent.
Description: This course will begin with a review of statistics and hypothesis testing, then introduce simple and multiple regression techniques; the estimation of regression using ordinary least squares; inference; and the use of spreadsheets and statistical software to estimate economic models.

 


 

ECON 383: Seminar in Selected Studies in Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 102 and ECON 249 or equivalent.
Description: Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.

 


 

ECON 383W: Seminar in Selected Studies in Business
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 and ECON 102; ENGL 110
Description: Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.

 


 

ECON 387: Advanced Econometrics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: For Quantitative Economics Majors, MATH 241 and ECON 382. For anyone else the prerequisite is ECON 382.
Description: This course is the second semester of a two-semester econometrics sequence designed for the quantitative economics major. It will introduce students to the computational aspects of econometric analysis using Python and R. This will complement the theoretical aspect of the course, which is to continue building on the regression analysis of the first semester, and introduce a number of important extensions. Topics will include static panel data models, instrumental variable methods and basic analysis of time series data. Upon completion of the course, students will have a sufficient background to read and produce empirical work using econometric techniques.

 


 

ECON 390: Research Methods in Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103, 102 or 104, 202 or 225, 201 or 226, 249
Description: Class size is limited to 20. The purpose of this course is to teach students some research methods in economics, including data sources, presentation and interpretation of data, organization writing, editorial revision, and oral presentation of brief research memos, a major research paper, use of literature searches, government documents, and computers to access data banks, and introduction to computer-based modeling.

 


 

ECON 390W: Research Methods in Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 or 103, 102 or 104, 202 or 225, 201 or 226, 249
Description: Class size is limited to 20. The purpose of this course is to teach students some research methods in economics, including data sources, presentation and interpretation of data, organization writing, editorial revision, and oral presentation of brief research memos, a major research paper, use of literature searches, government documents, and computers to access data banks, and introduction to computer-based modeling.

 


 

ECON 391: Special Problems
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in economics under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)

 


 

ECON 391W: Special Problems
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in economics under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)

 


 

ECON 392W: Honors Seminar
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 201 or 226, ECON 202 or 225, and ECON 382 or BUS 384
Description: Students must have a B or above in their economics courses. This class is required for high honors students in economics. Class size is limited to 20. The course will cover use of data sources, literature searches, analysis of data, presentation and interpretation of research results, and the process of writing and revision for economists.

 


 

ECON 393: Intenship for Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Completion of 60 credits including ECON 101 or 103 and 102 or 104 and two additional ECON courses
Description: Economics majors are given the opportunity to do a supervised internship in an appropriate corporate, not-for-profit, research organization, small business or governmental organization. Internships are subject to the approval of the Internship Director, and approval must be sought a minimum of one month prior to the internship. The internship should be a minimum of 8 hours per week for 15 weeks. Students must meet periodically during the internship with the Internship Director. The student must write a report on his or her internship. While the Department will endeavor to find an appropriate internship, often in the not-for-profit sector, students may also locate a potential internship and submit it to the Internship Director for approval.

 


 

ECON 703: Price and Distribution Theory
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: One-semester course in microeconomic theory.

 


 

ECON 705: Mathematical Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: A one-semester course in differential calculus and a course in price theory; and either graduate matriculation or permission of the Chair
Description: An introduction to applications of mathematics to economic theory and problems. Illustrations are drawn from linear programming, theory of games, and difference equations.

 


 

ECON 711: Money and Capital Markets
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Examination of the sources and uses of funds in financial markets; market structure of interest rates; flow-of-funds analysis.

 


 

ECON 715: Corporate Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 241 or equivalent
Description: The theory of investor and firm behavior in financial markets under uncertainty. Among the topics discussed are portfolio theory, the capital asset pricing model, arbitrage pricing theory, asset valuation theory, and optimum firm decision-making rules with regard to capital budgeting, capital structure, and dividend policy.

 


 

ECON 721: Econometrics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: One semester of calculus and ECON 249 or equivalent
Description: Analysis of the classic single equation regression models (simple and multiple), simultaneous equation models, and special problems associated with time series and qualitative data.

 


 

ECON 726: Introduction to Operations Research
4 hr.; 3 credits

 


 

ECON 750: Industrial Organization and Control
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Structure of the American economy; governmental policies aiming at the preservation of competition in industrial markets and regulation of trade practices.

 


 

ECON 770: Urban Economics: Tools, Methodology, and Applications
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Introduces students to major subject areas, theories, and research tools of urban and regional economics and their applications.

 


 

BUS 105: Economic Foundations
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 131, 141, or 151
Description: Economic principles and relationships that serve as the foundation for many of the valuation tools used in finance. The first half of the course develops the microeconomics behind classic valuation theory, equilibrium pricing, and decisionmaking under uncertainty. The second half covers topics in international macroeconomics including interest rate determination and monetary policy, foreign exchange rates, money and banking, and international capital flows and financial crises.



BUS 160W: Introduction to Business Writing
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Study of the role of communication as a variable defining, organizing, mediating, and affecting the outcomes of interactions within organization environments. Introduction to and mastery of basic oral formats and non-verbal communication techniques likely to be useful as a participant in corporate organizations. Some sections of this course will be limited to students enrolled in the Business and Liberal Arts minor and some sections of this course will be limited to students admitted to the major in business administration.



BUS 241: Corporation Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 102
Description: An analysis of the major funds flows of the firm. Development of the principles for determining specific assets a firm should acquire, as well as the least-cost methods of financing those assets. Topics considered include the management of cash, inventories, receivables, and fixed assets; alternative sources of available funds, including short-, intermediate-, and long-term sources of financing; the cost of capital; optimum capital structure; and corporate dividend policy.



BUS 243: Economics of Distribution and Marketing
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 102; BUS 160W
Description: Functions, structure, and cost of the system of distribution of goods and services. Emphasizes the dynamic character of marketing and the major problems encountered at every stage of the distribution process. Merchandising and sales promotional activities, price policies, selection of channels of distribution.



BUS 247: Business Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 102; ENGL 110
Description: The application of economic principles to the problems of business decision making. Topics considered include decisions under risk and uncertainty; economic forecasting; estimation of demand and cost functions; price strategy under monopoly, oligopoly, and competition; diversification and conglomeration; and productivity analysis in worker and executive compensation.



BUS 250: Financial Statement Analysis for Non-accountants
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 201
Description: This course is designed for non-accountants who want to learn financial statement analysis. The student will be exposed to the various analytical approaches in evaluating a company’s balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. The course covers key ratios in ascertaining a business entity’s liquidity, solvency, profitability, asset utilization, return on investment, earning potential, and risk. The knowledge gained will allow for more informative credit, investment, business and audit decisions. (Not open to accounting majors.)



BUS 255: International Accounting for Non-accountants
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 102
Description: The course is designed for non-accountants such as those majoring in business administration. The course emphasizes the international business context of international accounting and financial decision making. We discuss the accounting and reporting for multinational companies, current international accounting issues facing the business world, comparative international analysis, international segment reporting, and other related topics.



BUS 301: Economics of CryptoAssets
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: The application of economic principles to provide a comprehensive overview of blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies. Topics considered include the basics of bitcoin and blockchain technology a taxonomy of cryptoassets valuation framework for cryptoassets cryptotokens as micropayments governance issues and the democratization of entrepreneurship and innovation through digital tokens.



BUS 341W: Intermediate Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: BUS 241, BUS 160W, and ECON 249 or permission of the instructor; ENGL 110
Description: Covers the five most important problems of modern finance at a level beyond Economics 241. These are: the relationship between risk and returns, as expressed in the Capital Asset Pricing Model and Arbitrage Pricing Theory; the valuation of debt and equity instruments; the cost of capital and optimal capital structure; capital budgeting; and dividend policy.



BUS 350: Investment Analysis
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: BUS 241 or permission of instructor; ECON 249 or equivalent, and ENGL 110
Description: An analysis of the types of securities available in the market covering both individual and institutional portfolio analyses and management. Considers the formulation of appropriate portfolio investment objectives, techniques for achieving them, and institutional, legal, and other constraints on portfolio strategies. Impacts of macro- and micro-economic activity on portfolio performance, and measures of performance are discussed.



BUS 351: Financial Markets
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: BUS 241 or permission of instructor and MATH 131 or equivalent
Description: Survey of the United States and international money and capital markets. Emphasis is on modern institutions and practices. The course also considers the analytics and consequences of recent trading techniques.



BUS 352: Investment Management
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: BUS 350
Description: This course provides a detailed examination of portfolio management. Topics include: definition and measurement of risk, market efficiency, testing for inefficiencies, components and determinants of trading costs, mechanics of creating and managing a portfolio and investment philosophies.



BUS 353: Options and Futures Markets
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: BUS 241 and ECON 249
Description: The economic role of options and futures markets is examined. Specific topics include: determinants of forward and futures prices, option valuation using binominal trees and Monte Carlo simulation, implied binominal trees, relation between puts and calls, uses of options in investment strategies, hedging techniques, exotic options, applications to corporate securities and other financial instruments.



BUS 354: Multinational Financial Management
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: BUS 241
Description: This course studies the various issues impacting multinational corporations and their international financial management. The course deals with the significance of a country’s balance of payments deficits and surpluses; the markets for foreign exchange; exchange rate determination and volatility; methods to deal with currency fluctuations; currency bloc such as the European Monetary Union; the decision-making process concerning location and financing of production and investments; methods of assessing country risk; international taxation issues.



BUS 355: Topics in International Business and Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 328 and 326
Description: This capstone course is designed to develop the student skill in systematically analyzing and presenting solutions to various problems presented in the case studies in international business, bringing to bear the theory and information learned in previous course. The student will write 4 or 5 “briefing papers” during the semester. Topics vary from semester to semester and include topics such as assessing barriers to trade, risk management in foreign investment, a plan for a feasibility study of setting up an plant abroad, developing a marketing plan for foreign country, problems in evaluating foreign companies for purchase or business partner, evaluating and hedging of currency risks, and assessing political and economic policy risks.



BUS 383: Seminar in Selected Studies in Economics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 102 and ECON 249 or equivalent.
Description: Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.



BUS 383W: Seminar in Selected Studies in Business
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 and ECON 102; ENGL 110
Description: Subject varies with the instructor and the semester. May be repeated for credit provided the topic is not the same.



BUS 384: Forecasting and Regression Analysis for Business
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 249 or equivalent
Description: A survey of macroeconomic and microeconomic forecasting techniques. Emphasis will be placed on multiple regression analysis and the application of regression techniques to problems in finance and economics.



BUS 385: CFA Workshop
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Senior standing and completion of/co-registration with finance courses
Description: Course is intended to prepare students for the Level I CFA exam.



BUS 386: Financial Econometrics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 382 or BUS 384; and MATH 241 or permission by the instructor.
Description: The course will introduce students to methods of empirical analysis of financial markets. It will cover modern statistical and econometric techniques necessary for both professional and academic quantitative research in finance. Particular emphasis will be placed on measuring risk of holding and trading financial assets. Topics include: autoregressive and moving average models, ARCH, GARCH, analysis of high frequency intraday financial data.



BUS 391: Special Problems
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Permission of department; ENGL 110
Description: Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in business under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)



BUS 391W: Special Problems
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Permission of department; ENGL 110
Description: Recommended for students of high standing who want to do special individual research in business under the guidance of an instructor. (A student may receive credit only once for courses in the 391.1-391.3 series.)



BUS 392W: Honors Seminar
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: BUS 341W, 350, 351 (for Finance majors) or ECO 328, 326 and 355W (for International Business Majors) and ECO 382 or BUS 384 and permission of the department
Description: This class is required for High Honors Students in Finance and International Business. Class size is limited to 20. The course will cover use of data sources, literature searches, analysis of data, presentation and interpretation of research results, and the process of writing and revision.



BUS 393: Internship for Business Administration
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Completion of 60 credits including Eco 101 and 102, ACCT 101 and 102 and two other required courses in the BBA program
Description: This course gives economics majors the opportunity to do a supervised internship in an appropriate corporate, not-for-profit, research organization, small business or governmental organization. Internships are subject to the approval of the Internship Director, and approval must be sought a minimum of one month prior to the internship. The internship should be a minimum of 8 hours per week for 15 weeks. Students must meet periodically during the internship with the Internship Director. The student must write a report on his or her internship. While the Department will endeavor to find an appropriate internship, often in the not-for-profit sector, students may also locate a potential internship and submit it to the Internship Director for approval.



 

ACCT 101: Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Accounting I
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Upper freshman standing
Description: First course for accounting majors. Also gives nonmajors a fundamental understanding of the language of business as expressed in financial reports.



ACCT 102: Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Accounting II
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 101 and sophomore standing
Description: Continuation of Accounting 101



ACCT 201: Intermediate Accounting I
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 102 and sophomore standing
Description: Intensive study of the theories of financial accounting, generally accepted accounting principles, and applications thereof. Relevant opinions and statements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC.



ACCT 202: Intermediate Accounting II
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 201 and junior standing
Description: Continuation of Accounting 201. Relevant mathematical principles and applications thereof to accounting. Relevant opinions and statements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC.



ACCT 261: Business Law I
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Junior standing.
Description: Introduction to the law. Seeks to provide majors and nonmajors with an understanding of the law and the social forces that shape it. The basic structure through which law is implemented and enforced is reviewed, in addition to the specific rules of law relating to contracts, trusts, and estates.



ACCT 305: Cost Accounting
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 201 and junior standing
Description: The concepts and procedures used to account for the cost of manufacturing and selling, with their practical application in different types of cost accumulation systems (i.e., job-order costing, process costing, joint product costing, standard costing, and direct costing).



ACCT 306: Quantitative Techniques in Planning and Control
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 305, ECON 241, ECON 249, and junior standing
Description: The application of quantitative and programming techniques in managerial decision making, including probability analysis, mathematical programming, network models, queuing theory, Monte Carlo simulation, and regression/correlation analysis, inventory models, and capital budgeting.



ACCT 311: Advanced Accounting
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 202 and junior standing
Description: Theory of accounting applicable to problems peculiar to large-scale business operations, including the problems of accounting for installment sales, consignment sales, branch operations, mergers, insolvencies, liquidations, and the preparation of consolidated financial reports. Relevant opinions and statements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC.



ACCT 350: Financial Statement Analysis
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 202
Description: Analysis is made of financial statements from the perspective of users and preparers of financial reports including investors, creditors, auditors, accountants, and management. Financial statements and related disclosures will be analyzed to gain a perspective on the company’s health.



ACCT 355: Accounting in International Environment
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 306
Description: This advanced-level course takes up the accounting, tax, and control problems and procedures arising from the flow of goods, services, money, and investments across national frontiers.



ACCT 361: HAS NOW BEEN RENAMED ACCT261 - Business Law I
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Junior standing.
Description: Introduction to the law. Seeks to provide majors and nonmajors with an understanding of the law and the social forces that shape it. The basic structure through which law is implemented and enforced is reviewed, in addition to the specific rules of law relating to contracts, trusts, and estates.



ACCT 367: Federal and New York State Taxes
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ACCT 102 and senior standing
Description: An introduction to the federal income tax as it relates to individuals. Particular emphasis is given to the basic multi-tiered tax structure. The underlying concepts of basis, inclusion, exclusion, deduction, are defined, utilizing the Internal Revenue Code and related material. Special classes of taxpayers including partnerships, estates, trusts, corporations of various types, and foreign taxpayers are considered as well as accounting and procedural rules.



 

ANTH 206: Peoples of South America
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Six credits in Social science or sophomore standing.



ANTH 208: Peoples of South Asia
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Six credits in Social science or sophomore standing.



ANTH 209: Peoples of Europe
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Six credits in Social science or sophomore standing.



ANTH 210: Peoples of East Asia
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Six credits in Social science or sophomore standing.



ANTH 211: Peoples of Africa
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Six credits in Social science or sophomore standing.



ANTH 212: Peoples of the Middle East
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Six credits in Social science or sophomore standing.



ANTH 215: Peoples of the Caribbean
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Six credits in Social science or sophomore standing.



ANTH 215W: Peoples of the Caribbean
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Six credits in Social sicence or sophomore standing.



ANTH 302: Ecology and Culture
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Nine credits in anthropology and junior standing
Description: This seminar focuses on the question, "Why do cultures change?". Taking ethnographic and archaeological examples of foragers, herders, and farmers, the class will examine the relationship between environmental change, human population growth, technological change, the organization of the economy, and the exercise of power.



ANTH 304: Anthropology of Development
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Twelve credits in anthropology including 200 and 201 as prerequisites or corequisites or permission of instructor
Description: Third world and indigenous peoples are being incorporated more fully into the modern world system by means of processes generally labeled as “development.” Through an examination of several cases, this course will analyze the economic, political, cultural, demographic, and ecological impacts of this process.



 

CSCI 018: CSCI048, "Spreadsheet Programming" is replacing CSCI018, "Computing for Business" in the BBA curriculum
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Fundamentals of using the operating system and application software. Business-oriented uses of software applications including: word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, and database management. Emphasis on realistic situations and problem solving strategies used in business. An important part of the course is a research project/presentation of topics involving current issues arising from the use of computer technology in a business environment. Some sections will be limited to those admitted to the major in business administration, and others will be limited to those admitted to the minor in Business and Liberal Arts (BALA).



CSCI 048: Spreasheet Programming
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: One MATH course numbered 110 or higher
Description: In-depth introduction to spreadsheets as an effective tool for the organization, processing, and analysis of numerical information in such areas as business, finance, engineering, natural and social sciences. Topics include: basic cell operation, text manipulation, formulas, functions, arrays, circular references, charting techniques, pivot tables, conditional formatting, and VBA programming.



CSCI 087: Introduction to Scientific Computing
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq.: CSCI 12
Description: Concepts and principles of algorithmic problem-solving. Fundamental skills to program and use computational tools for modeling, numerical simulation, data analysis, and visualization with applications in engineering, mathematics, medicine, natural and social sciences.



CSCI 111: Introduction to Algorithmic Problem-Solving
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq. or coreq.: MATH 120 or 151 or equivalent.
Description: Introduction to the principles of algorithmic analysis and computational implementation. Topics include implementation methodologies, including choice and use of data types, objects, classes, and methods; control structures; basic data structures including arrays; procedures and functions; parameters and arguments; scope and lifetime of variables; input and output; Written documentation describing algorithms and identification and correction of algorithmic implementations.



ENGL 110: College Writing 4 hr.; 3 credits Description: The arts and practices of effective writing and reading in college, especially the use of language to discover ideas. Methods of research and documentation will be taught, along with some introduction to rhetorical purposes and strategies. Students will spend one hour per week conferring with each other or with the instructor about their writing.

 

ENSCI 100: Our Planet in the 21st Century: Challenges To Humanity 4 hr.; 3 credits Description: Focuses on two major themes of increasing concern to society: global climate change and the environment, and human health. Theme I, global climate change introduces basic concepts in mathematics and physics and the implications of climate change to society. Theme II, environment and human health introduces students to the basic concepts in chemistry and biology used in the study of anthropogenic pollutants and naturally occurring poisons, and to policy changes aimed at reducing human exposure to pollutant’s in developed and developing countries.

 

 

GEOL 025: Natural Resources and the Environment
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: World distribution, production, and requirements for mineral and energy resources. Use, abuse, conservation, and pollution of resources.



 

HIST 106: History of Latin America, 1825 to the Present
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Survey from the wars of independence to the present; special attention to political concepts, foreign imperialism, social and economic problems.



HIST 145: Modern South Asia
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: History of the Indian subcontinent in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The development of colonialism in India, anti-colonial movements, the partition of the subcontinent, the experience of women in colonial and post-colonial South Asia, the interplay between religion and national identity, and modern popular culture.



HIST 222: Europe since 1945
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Western European recovery; the East European revolutions and the development of communist regimes; the Cold War and nuclear armament; the problems stemming from the end of colonial empires, population increase, and economic development.



 

HNRS 226: Honors College Seminar
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Shaping the Future of New York in the 21st Century: The Political Economy of New York City. Enrollment is limited to CUNY Honors College students.



 

MATH 116: Mathematics of Finance
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 110 or knowledge of intermediate algebra.
Description: Topics include simple interest, compound interest, mortgages, bonds, depreciation, annuities, and life insurance. This course may be counted toward the LASAR Scientific Methodology and Quantitative Reasoning requirement.



MATH 122: Precalculus
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Three years of high school math.
Description: This course offers a thorough introduction to the topics required for calculus. Topics include: real and complex numbers, algebra of functions, the fundamental theorem of algebra, trigonometry, logarithms and exponential functions, conic sections, and the use of graphic calculators. Students unsure of their preparation for calculus are advised to take the Queens College mathematics placement test.



MATH 131: Calculus with Applications to the Social Sciences I
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 122, or placement by departmental exam, or permission of the department
Description: The first part of a two-semester sequence (Mathematics 131 and 132) intended to introduce the fundamental ideas and techniques of the calculus to nonscience students. Special emphasis is given to applications. Credit is given for each course satisfactorily completed; a student need not take the entire sequence. Topics include functions and graphs; derivatives and differentiation techniques; the marginal concept in economics; optimization methods; compound interest; exponential and logarithmic functions. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 141 or 151.



MATH 132: Calculus with Applications to the Social Sciences II
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 131
Description: A continuation of Mathematics 131. Topics include integrals and integration techniques; applications of integrals to statistics via probability densities; consumer’s and producer’s surplus; elementary differential equations; functions of several variables; optimization methods; Lagrange multipliers; multiple integrals.



MATH 141: Calculus/Differentiation
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 122, or placement by departmental exam, or permission of the department
Description: The first part of a three-semester sequence (Mathematics 141, 142, 143), covering the same material as Mathematics 151 and 152. Credit is given for each course satisfactorily completed; a student need not take the entire sequence. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 151.



MATH 142: Calculus/Integration
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 100 or 141
Description: A continuation of Mathematics 141. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 151.



MATH 143: Calculus/Infinite Series
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 142. MATH 151 does not satisfy the prerequisite
Description: A continuation of Mathematics 142. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 152.



MATH 151: Calculus/Differentiation & Integration
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 122, or placement by departmental exam, or permission of the department
Description: The first part of a two-semester sequence (Mathematics 151 and 152) intended for students who want to study mathematics, physics, chemistry, or engineering. Credit is given for each course satisfactorily completed; a student need not take the entire sequence. Students who want a less rapid introduction to calculus should take Mathematics 141. Topics include sets, inequalities, straight lines, circles, functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, formulas of differentiation, implicit differentiation, velocity, acceleration, maxima and minima, Rolle’s theorem, the mean value theorem, points of inflection, curve sketching, antiderivatives. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 141.



MATH 152: Calculus/Integration & Infinite Series
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 151
Description: Deals with several aspects of differential and integral calculus. Among the topics studied are the definite integral, applications of the definite integral, the differentiation of logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions, integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, and expansions of functions. Applications to problems of geometry and physics. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 142.



MATH 157: Honors Calculus I, II (MATH157 and 158)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Permission of Chair.
Description: Intensive course that is the first year of a two-year sequence (Mathematics 157, 158, 207, 208) that will cover elementary and advanced calculus. A rigorous treatment of calculus from a modern point of view is given. The best mathematics students are urged to take this course. Students taking this course can receive advanced placement credit for calculus courses taken in high school. Not open, without permission of the department Chair, to students who have passed Mathematics 141 or 151.



MATH 158: Honors Calculus I, II (MATH157 and 158)
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Permission of Chair.
Description: Intensive course that is the first year of a two-year sequence (Mathematics 157, 158, 207, 208) that will cover elementary and advanced calculus. A rigorous treatment of calculus from a modern point of view is given. The best mathematics students are urged to take this course. Students taking this course can receive advanced placement credit for calculus courses taken in high school. Not open, without permission of the department Chair, to students who have passed Mathematics 141 or 151.



MATH 201: Calculus
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 143 or 152
Description: A continuation of the work of Mathematics 143 or 152. The topics include polar coordinates, vectors, solid analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, double and triple integrals, functions of several variables, partial derivatives. Wherever possible, applications are made to problems of geometry and physics. Not open to students who are taking or who have passed Mathematics 132 (unless permission of the Chair is obtained).



MATH 231: Linear Algebra I
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: One semester of calculus
Description: An introduction to linear algebra with emphasis on techniques and applications. Topics to be covered include solutions of systems of linear equations, vector spaces, bases and dimension, linear transformations, matrix algebra, determinants, eigenvalues, and inner products. Not open to students who are enrolled in or who have completed Mathematics 237.



MATH 241: Introduction to Probability and Mathematical Statistics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: or coreq.: MATH 132 or 143 or 152
Description: An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of probability and statistics with an emphasis on applications. Topics to be covered include the axioms of probability, combinatorial methods, conditional probability, discrete and continuous random variables and distributions, expectations, confidence interval estimations, and tests of hypotheses using the normal, t, and chi-square distributions. Students taking this course may not receive credit for Mathematics 114, except by permission of the Chair. Not open to students who are taking or who have received credit for Mathematics 611.



MATH 242: Methods of Mathematical Statistics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 241. Preregistration is strongly advised for MATH 242. Students must email Wallace Goldberg, Chairperson of the MATH Department, at wallace.goldberg@qc.cuny.edu prior to pre-registration.
Description: A study of those methods of mathematical statistics that are most frequently used in the natural and social sciences, as well as actuarial science. Topics include estimation testing of statistical hypotheses, nonparametric tests, analysis of variance, correlation and regression analysis, and other methods of statistical analysis.



MATH 247: Linear Programming and Game Theory
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 231 or 237
Description: Methods for handling optimization problems that arise in management, engineering, physical sciences, and social sciences. Topics include convex geometry, the Simplex Algorithm, duality theory, and the Von Neumann minimax theorem of game theory.



MATH 271: Actuarial Mathematics I: Calculus and Probability
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 201; coreq.: MATH 241 or 611
Description: This course covers material in calculus and some probability required for the Course 1 Examination of the Society of Actuaries.



MATH 272: Actuarial Mathematics II: Probability and Risk Management
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: MATH 201 and 241 (or 611); coreq.: at least one of MATH 242, 621, 623, or 633
Description: This course covers material in probability and risk management required for the Course 1 Examination of the Society of Actuaries.



MATH 611: Introduction to Mathematical Probability
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: A one-year course in differential and integral calculus (including improper integrals).
Description: A first course in probability at an advanced level. Topics to be covered include axioms of probability, combinatorial analysis, conditional probability, random variables, binomial, Poisson, normal, and other distributions, mathematical expectation, and an introduction to statistical methods. Not open to students who have received credit for Mathematics 241 or 621. May not be counted toward the Master of Arts degree in Mathematics.



 

PHIL 104: PHIL160, "Business Ethics" is replacing PHIL104, "Introduction to Ethics" in the BBA curriculum
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: An investigation of rival theories concerning moral goodness, rightness, happiness, freedom and responsibility. Selected readings from classical and contemporary sources.



PHIL 104W: PHIL160, "Business Ethics" is replacing PHIL104, "Introduction to Ethics" in the BBA curriculum
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: An investigation of rival theories concerning moral goodness, rightness, happiness, freedom and responsibility. Selected readings from classical and contemporary sources.



PHIL 160: Business Ethics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 101 and 102
Description: An investigation of rival theories concerning moral goodness, rightness, happiness, freedom and responsibility. Selected readings from classical and contemporary sources.



 

PSCI 230: Politics of Development
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Politics and government in the underdeveloped areas of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Stress on the interaction of political, social, and economic forces. Attention is paid to foreign policy problems.



PSCI 231: Political Culture and Political Socialization
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: The effect on political systems and behavior of such phenomena as fundamental moral concerns and value systems, class structures, and folk practices; development of the individual’s orientation to political action and institutions.



PSCI 232: Comparative Political Economy
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Effects of economic structures and practices on the political and social systems.



PSCI 233: Transitions to Democracy
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: During the past generation, many nations have shifted from authoritarian and military rule to democracy. This course will examine the reasons for this development, the ways it has been accomplished, and the prospects for the future.



PSCI 234: Contemporary Western Europe
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Analysis of contemporary European political institutions and processes. Selected countries to be announced.



PSCI 235: Contemporary Russia
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: A survey of the political processes and governmental institutions of Russia, as well as the states of the former Soviet Union.



PSCI 236: The Politics of Developing Nations
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Politics and government in the underdeveloped areas of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Stress on the interaction of political, social, and economic forces. Attention to foreign policy problems.



PSCI 237: Contemporary Africa
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Primary focus on the dynamics of societies in transition in “SubSaharan” Africa from colonial dependency to independence, and from traditional tribal units to modern nations.



PSCI 238: Contemporary Asia
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: A survey of the political development and government institutions of the states in the Far East, chiefly China and Japan; analytical study of their historical background and foreign relations.



PSCI 239: Contemporary Latin America
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: A study of the political reality of Latin American countries through their constitutional organization and the actions and attitudes of power blocks within society. The role of political parties, dictatorship and caudillismo constitutional government, and democracy.



PSCI 240: Contemporary Middle East
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: A survey of Middle Eastern governments, political processes, and political group behavior.



PSCI 243: Contemporary Central America
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: An examination of the social, economic, and cultural forces that shape the political processes of Central American societies, including the application of political theories of Central American and foreign writers.



PSCI 250: International Law
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: An examination of the traditional and prevailing rules of international law governing relations among states and other international persons; special emphasis on recognition, succession, international treaties, and state jurisdiction over land, water, and aerial space.



PSCI 251: International Organization
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: After a brief treatment of the historical background of international organization and attempts to maintain peace, attention is given to the organizational, structural, and functional aspects of the United Nations and its related agencies. An evaluation of the contributions of these organizations to the maintenance of peace and to world economic, social, and political development is made.



PSCI 252: Contemporary Issues in International Relations
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: This course introduces students to some of the major issues that confront the world and provides them with basic analytical tools to help them understand these issues. Each section will focus on a particular issue, such as the control of weapons, women and war, international drug traffic, and the international trading system. The course will feature guest speakers from journalism, the UN, and various diplomatic missions. Topics to be announced. Course may be repeated with the permission of instructor if the topic is different.



PSCI 253: Problems in International Law and Administration
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: An analytical study of selected topics in international law and administration, such as means and procedures for the settlement of international disputes, responsibility of states and other issues in diplomatic practices, administrative problems of the United Nations and other international organs in the performance of their functions, as well as the changing conception and controversial principles of the law of war and neutrality.



PSCI 254: The Politics of the International Economy
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: This course deals with the relationship between international politics and international economics. It pays particular attention to the increasing political significance of international trade, global competition, and the international division of labor. Students will examine such issues as the role of states in the world economy, the activities of inter-governmental organizations such as the IMF and the World Bank, and the problems of inequality and unequal development.



PSCI 255: Comparative Foreign Policy
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: An analysis of patterns in the orientation of various nation-states toward their world environment, and of structures and processes by which various nation-states formulate foreign policies.



PSCI 256: Africa in World Politics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: The international relations of the African countries and the development of African foreign policies. Pan-Africanism, the cold war in Africa, neutralism, regional and international agencies.



PSCI 257: Western Europe in World Politics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: The role of the European states in world politics. Cohesion and conflict within the regions: the politics of European integration, Atlantic cooperation, and East-West relations.



PSCI 258: Asia in World Politics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: Historical examination of the policies of the major powers toward China, Japan, and Korea; their common interests and contradictions; conflicts between nationalism and imperialism in East Asia and adjacent areas; special emphasis on the complicated relationships between the United States and the governments in this region.



PSCI 259: Latin America In World Politics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: The relations of the Latin American countries with the United States, the European powers, and with each other. Pan-Americanism and the participation of Latin America in international organizations. Inter-American public international law.



PSCI 260: The Middle East in World Politics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: The expansion of the European State system into the Middle East and the regional adjustments. The changing patterns of regional and international politics in the Middle East, contrasting the League of Nations and the United Nations systems.



PSCI 261: Russia in World Politics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: An examination of the foreign policy of Russia; continuing conflicts with the West; the politics of economic integration.



PSCI 269: Colloquium In International Politics
4 hr.; 3 credits



 

RM 701: Risk Management
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq.: Completion of graduate core curriculum for the MS in Risk Management or permission of program director.
Description: The course provides a broad overview of why managing risk is important to organizations and of the risk management function. The course utilizes the RM framework to identify sources of value and stakeholder objectives to categorize events that pose risk to determine the organization‚ appetite for risk and to determine levels of risk retention. The course covers various risk types and examines how each is quantified transferred or retained and priced-for. The course is case-study and group-study intensive.



RM 702: Accounting for Risk Management
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq. or coreq.: RM 701, Risk Management.
Description: This course is intended to provide graduate level exposure to accounting theory for students enrolled in the MS in Risk Management program. The course will cover essentials of the conceptual framework of accounting and will focus on issues affecting recognition and measurement of the economic events that affect financial statements in particular those that affect the firm’s risk profile and risk transfer. The course will not be open to MS in Accounting students. Credit will not be given for this course if ACCT 350 or BUS 250 has already been taken and students will be required to take an additional elective from the RM program offerings.



RM 703: Analysis of Investment and Market Risk
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: ECON 602, Introduction to Corporate Finance and Money and Banking or BUS 241, Corporate Finance; ECON 649, Statistics as Applied to Economics and Business; or equivalent as approved by the program director.
Description: The course will focus on the application of financial theory to the issues and problems of investment management. Topics will include bond valuation and strategies, stock valuation and strategies, portfolio optimization and asset allocation, the CAPM, and their implications for investment management. The course will first examine the valuation and selection of various investment instruments, then move on to cover portfolio optimization issues and risk management.



RM 704: Risk Measurement
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq. or coreq.: RM 701, Risk Management.
Description: This course provides an in-depth review of the fundamentals of probability and statistics, followed by the measurement of various risk types. The course examines instances of market failure, the role of collateralization requirements, the impact of term, time horizon, and covariance, and extreme value theory. The course also covers probabilistic and stochastic risk modeling calculations of value-at-risk stress testing and other risk metrics and the limitations of each of these measures.



RM 705: Risk Transfer to Financial Markets
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq. or coreq.: RM 701, Introduction to Risk Management; RM 703 or BUS 350, Investment Analysis is recommended.
Description: The primary emphasis of this course is on the structure, pricing, hedging, and strategies of futures and options contracts and their applications in a risk management context. The economic role of options and futures markets is examined. Specific topics include: determinants of forward and futures prices, option valuation using binominal trees and Monte Carlo simulation implied binominal trees relation between puts and calls uses of options in investment strategies hedging techniques exotic options applications to corporate securities and other financial instruments.



RM 706: Risk Transfer to Insurance Markets
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq. or coreq.: Undergraduate degree in Accounting or completion of Graduate Core Curriculum: ECON 601, ECON 602, ECON 649 and ACCT 600, or permission of program director. RM 701, Introduction to Risk Management is recommended.
Description: This course examines risk transfer to insurance markets. Topics covered will include the variety of ways that risk transfer can occur including quota share and excess of loss agreements, catastrophe bonds, captives, reciprocals, segregated cells, and their structuring, such as retentions, limits, corridors, collateralization, reinstatement, and commutation provisions, and structured/financial insurance. Insurance products will be evaluated for their efficiency in risk transfer. How effective insurance markets are relative to capital markets will be evaluated in terms of terms and conditions, pricing, and basis risk.



RM 707: Financial Statement Analysis
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq.: RM 702, Accounting for Risk Management or ACCT 201, intermediate Accounting I and ACCT 202, intermediate Accounting II.
Description: Analyses are made of financial statements of public companies from the perspective of investors, management creditors accountants and auditors. Financial statements and related disclosures will be analyzed to gain a perspective on a company’s health. Business valuation models and techniques to develop forecasts and pro forma results will be discussed and illustrated. Ratio analysis and key performance indicators will be emphasized with a case study approach to this subject. Credit will not be given if ACCT 350 or BUS 250 has been taken.



RM 708: Financial Econometrics
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq.: ECON 721 or equivalent; and RM 704, or MATH 241, or permission of the instructor.
Description: The course covers modern statistical and econometric techniques necessary for both professional and academic quantitative research in finance. Particular emphasis will be placed on measuring and analyzing the risk of holding and trading financial assets.



RM 709: Portfolio Management
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq. or coreq.: RM 703, Analysis of Investment and Market Risks, or BUS 350, Investment Analysis. Individual courses may be waived for those students who have taken equivalent courses as part of their undergraduate program.
Description: This course provides a detailed examination of portfolio management. Topics include definition and measurement of risk market efficiency, testing for inefficiencies, components and determinants of trading costs, mechanics of creating and managing a portfolio, and investment philosophies. The mechanics of creating and managing a portfolio are illustrated for both bonds and equities.



RM 710: Fixed Income Instruments
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq.: ECON 602, Introduction to Corporate Finance and Money and Banking, or BUS 241, Corporate Finance. Recommended: MATH 131, Calculus with Applications to the Social Sciences.
Description: The course exposes students to an in-depth analysis of the concepts encountered in the market for fixed income securities. The student will develop tools to price bond and money market instruments, understand the term structure of interest rates, analyze the Treasury yield curve, and evaluate credit yield spreads. The course illustrates hedging and other trading and portfolio strategies and explores fixed income derivative instruments.



RM 711: Applied Financial Analysis
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: This is a course designed to teach you how to effectively utilize technology for quantitative finance. Specifically, you will use advanced features of Microsoft Excel and you will learn how to write programs in Visual Basic for Applications. The focus will be on the development of financial models and the use of large financial datasets.



RM 790: Applied Dynamc Financial Analysis
4 hr.; 3 credits
Description: This is the capstone course for the Risk Management program, in which students will run a dynamic financial analysis for a corporation modeling its financial asset and liability exposures and estimating future cash flow time-varying exposures and covariance across exposures. Students will build models with applications either to pension funds life insurance non-life insurance banking and treasury/funding operations.



RM 791: Applied Dynamc Financial Analysis Model Building
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq.: RM 790, Applied Dynamic Financial Analysis.
Description: In this course, students will contribute to the building and development of Dynamic Financial Analysis (DFA) models tailored to a financial institution, non-financial corporation, or pension fund. The DFA model is an asset- liability management model in which an organization’s asset and liability values are forecasted over time and simulated by allowing economic, financial, and other business drivers of the cash flows to vary stochastically, in a dynamic and simultaneous fashion, using Monte Carlo and other simulation methods. The course is open to students only by permission of the program director."



RM 792: Special Topics in Risk Management
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: Prereq. or coreq.: Will vary with the particular topic, or with permission of the program director.
Description: This course will be a seminar in enterprise risk management covering a special topic as it relates to RM, such as governance behavioral finance or corporate strategy.



 

SOC 273: Social Change in Africa
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: SOC 101 or permission of instructor
Description: Problems and processes of social change in Africa. Theories of social change are evaluated in the context of Africa. Topics include: ethnicity; nationalism; rural and traditional social structures; urbanization and urban problems; class relations; state structures; state and civil society; social development.



SOC 274: Social Change in Latin America and the Caribbean
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: SOC 101 or permission of instructor
Description: Problems and processes of social change in Latin America and the Caribbean. Various theories of social change are evaluated in the context of Latin America and the Caribbean. Topics include ethnic and race relations, migration (internal and external), state structures; state and civil society, interstate relations, problems of social development.



SOC 275: Sociology of Asian Americas
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: SOC 101
Description: This course takes a sociological approach to Asian Americans in general and six major Asian ethnic groups in particular. Topics include the history of Asian immigration, historical cases of discrimination against Asian Americans, settlement patterns, occupational and economic adjustment, community organization and ethnicity, intergroup relations, and marriage and family life.



SOC 279: Globalization: Social and Geographic Perspectives
4 hr.; 3 credits
Prerequisits: SOC 101
Description: The components, causes, consequences, and implications of the process of globalization; structural, social, and cultural aspects of globalization; emergent patterns, historical context, and social geography of international inequality, poverty, social change, development, and regional integration; political, social movement, and policy responses; international cooperation and the role of the nonprofit sector.